A Tech/Law Talk Show designed to cover modern technology and Internet issues with host Dave Levine.


Show # 249 — Lorelei Kelly on resilient government — posted

I’m excited to post Show # 249, February 26, my interview with Lorelei Kelly of the New America Foundation on technology and legislative decision-making. Lorelei has done unique, critical and groundbreaking working focusing on the collapse of substantive expertise within Congress. More recently, Lorelei has been working on how governments can build resiliency into the legislative process in order to be able to operate effectively and proactively in our dynamic society. Thus, e-government, Congress’ current state, the challenges of policy-making in today’s DC, and her concept of “resilient government” was the focus of our discussion. Lorelei’s work deserves significant attention, I’m an unabashed fan, and she’s an engaging speaker, so I hope that you enjoy the show!

Show notes:

(a) The State of Our Union is Strong (in Oregon), Huffington Post, January 16, 2016.

(b) Civility Is a National Security Issue, Huffington Post, March 25, 2016.

(c) Congress’ Wicked Problem, Open Society Institute, documenting the destruction of expertise capacity within Congress.

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Spring 2016 schedule posted!

I’m very excited about this quarter’s slate of terrific guests. Aside from the tenth anniversary interview with Larry Lessig, the range of guests spans areas including intellectual property, marketing, freedom of information, robotics, Internet governance and history, and Jewish history. In other words, its a typical Hearsay Culture lineup!

As always, the show is about the guests. I’m grateful for their willingness to come on the show and share their knowledge with all of you — who are the reason that I do the show. Look for the first show to air on April 15!

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Lawrence Lessig to return to celebrate Hearsay Culture’s tenth anniversary!

In May 2006, I launched Hearsay Culture from my office at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, where I was then a resident fellow. When I walked over to KZSU’s studios across campus to record my first interview with “Dave,” the anonymous online poker player, I was nervous and wondering whether this would be my first and last KZSU interview. I did not envision that I’d wind up doing 250 shows over 10 years (and counting), or the next sentence.

I’m thrilled to announce that Lawrence Lessig will be back on the show on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 to celebrate Hearsay Culture’s tenth anniversary! Larry was guest number nine on August 16, 2006, and was instrumental in the show’s early success.

Larry will be joining me at Elon for a “live” recorded interview on Tuesday, April 26 from 12:30-2pm in Room 207 at Elon Law at 201 N. Greene Street in Greensboro, North Carolina. The public is invited to attend. No tickets are required. Q&A will follow the interview from about 1:40-2pm, and a reception follows at 2pm. I hope that you can make it if you’re anywhere near Greensboro!

If you’re wondering: we’ll be discussing Larry’s current work on campaign finance reform and fixing democracy, his Presidential run, as well as his reflections on the last 10 years of Internet law and policy. The show for air will remain one hour, with the Q&A as exclusive on-line content. The show will air on KZSU later during the week of April 25.

Thanks much to my employer, Elon University School of Law, as well as Elon University’s Turnage Family Faculty Innovation and Creativity Fund for the Study of Political Communication (and my wonderful colleague Laura Roselle) for support to bring Larry to Elon. Please contact me if you have questions, and I hope to see you on April 26!

Note: the full schedule of awesome Spring 2016 guests will be posted tomorrow, April 5, with three more winter shows to follow this week.

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Show # 248 — Prof. Ellen Goodman and Julia Powles on the “right to be forgotten” — posted

I’m pleased to post Show # 248, January 29, my interview with The Guardian’s Julia Powles and Prof. Ellen Goodman of Rutgers Law School, on the “Right to Be Forgotten.” Julia and Ellen have been focusing on the right to be forgotten (“RtBF”) for several years, and have done laudable work seeking transparency from its foremost actor, Google [disclosure: I was one of the signatories to the referenced letter]. The RtBF is a prime example of the clash of privacy, information, information platforms and power in technology today, and getting one’s head around its complexity requires an interdisciplinary understanding of technology law and policy. In our wide-ranging discussion, we took at hard look at the RtBF, as well as what it teaches us about platforms like Google’s broad power to impact human knowledge.

Show notes:*

* This new feature is designed to allow listeners easier access to core references related to the interview. I plan to include them in all upcoming show posts. I hope that you find them useful!

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Show # 247 — Nato Thompson, author of Seeing Power — posted

As promised (at least via Twitter), I’m finally posting new shows for the winter quarter of 2016. First up: Show # 247, January 15, 2016, my interview with Nato Thompson, author of Seeing Power: Art and Activism in the 21st Century. Nato is an atypical but completely appropriate Hearsay Culture guest: an art curator. In Nato’s book (and broader work), he studies the use of art as a social and political force in a world infused with easy and transformative communication technologies. In our discussion, we explored the challenges and opportunities presented to and by our creative activists, and how consumers can interact with and react to this demonstration of power. Given the power of images and physical structure in our world, Nato’s focus is both highly relevant and largely unique. I greatly enjoyed chatting with Nato, and hope that you find the discussion enlightening!

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Show # 246 — Member of European Parliament Marietje Schaake on democracy and technology in the EU — posted

I’m pleased to post Show # 246, November 6, my interview with Member of the European Parliament Marietje Schaake on democracy and technology in Europe. Recommended by former Hearsay Culture guest Lousewies van der Laan of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe, Marietje is a leading EU public official focusing on technology policy and the impact of technology on democracy. Her work is a perfect fit for Hearsay Culture, as it spans issues including Internet freedom, dual use technology, copyright policy, international trade agreements like the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the EU’s Digital Single Market. In our wide-ranging interview, we covered all of these topics, and even got into a discussion about EU-US relations and the impact of Edward Snowden’s revelations on that relationship. Marietje was an outstanding guest, and we had a terrific discussion. I look forward to having her back on the show in the future.

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Show # 245 — David Brin on transparency and cyber-utopianism — posted

I’m pleased to post Show # 245, October 9, my interview with author David Brin, on transparency, reciprocal accountability, cyber-utopianism and the preservation of excitement in an age of cynicism. David was an early guest on Hearsay Culture, having been on show # 30 back in early 2007 discussing his now-classic Transparent Society. In the intervening eight years, our sense of utopianism has continued to wane, even as technology’s ability to positively confront the world’s ills has improved. David’s prolific writings on this and other topics was the subject of our far-ranging discussion, from transparency today to how to teach children to maintain energy and optimism despite life’s seemingly hyper-complex challenges. As in 2007, David was a fascinating and engaging guest, and I greatly enjoyed our talk.

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Show # 244 — Prof. Andrea Matwyshyn on the DMCA and security researchers — posted

This has been a crazy semester. Thus, I am delinquent in posting shows from this quarter. I am about to update the record.

Let’s start with Show # 244, October 2, my interview with Prof. Andrea Matwyshyn of Northeastern University Law School, on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and the Volkwagen fraud scandal. Andrea has been doing outstanding work focusing on how copyright law can impede the ability of computer security researchers to conduct their research. On behalf of several academic security researchers, she submitted a request for an exemption under the DMCA for such research, and found success in late October. In our interview, we discussed the nature of computer security research, the law around it, and its implications for issues like research around the still-unfolding Volkswagen scandal. I am a big fan of Andrea’s work, and was delighted to have her on the show. I hope that you enjoy the interview.

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Show # 243 — Prof. Jacqueline Lipton, author of Rethinking Cyberlaw — posted

For the final of the July shows, I’m thrilled to post Show # 243, July 31, my interview with Prof. Jacqueline Lipton of The University of Akron Law School, author of Rethinking Cyberlaw: A New Vision for Internet Law. Jacqui’s work is well known to Internet and intellectual property law scholars, and she makes a wonderful contribution with her take on the state of Internet Law as a field today. Focusing primarily on copyright, trademark and speech caselaw and doctrine, Jacqui suggests that Internet Law’s primary focus is now information and intermediaries (think Google or Facebook). As I’m going to be teaching Internet Law again starting in a few weeks, I’m integrating Jacqui’s insights into my materials. We discussed the state of the field and where its headed in our discussion, which was a lot of fun.

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Show # 242 — Prof. Natasha Schüll, author of Addiction By Design — posted

The third show for today’s salvo of new shows is Show # 242, July 24, my interview with Prof. Natasha Schüll of MIT, author of Addiction by Design: Machine Gambling in Las Vegas. Natasha’s ground-breaking book is an eye-opening study of the ways that technology can and is used to stoke the human predilection for addiction. Focusing on Las Vegas, Natasha’s deep dive into the world of addicted gamblers exposes the capabilities (and some limitations) of an industry’s efforts to reap profits. Moreover, the ease with which programmers can alter games in order to increase gambling (and the resulting losses) is startling. As Natasha points out, people are in the game not just for money; we discussed that dynamic as well as the future of gaming and addiction in our fascinating interview.

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