Show # 220 — Profs. James Grimmelmann and David Post on Aereo’s copyright impact and Facebook’s emotional manipulation study — posted

I’m pleased to post Show # 220, August 6, my interview with James Grimmelmann of the University of Maryland School of Law and David Post of Temple University School of Law, on the recent US Supreme Court decision in ABC, Inc. v. Aereo and Facebook’s emotional manipulation study. David and James are both repeat guests on Hearsay Culture, but have never been on together. We focused on two issues: (a) the Aereo amicus brief authored by David and James on behalf of law professors, and the impact of the Aereo decision on copyright law and how new content delivery systems may or may not run afoul of copyright law, and (b) the impact of Facebook’s secretive 2014 behavioral study in which it manipulated the content delivered to users’ newsfeeds, particularly James’ extensive analysis of the problems associated with the study. Both issues raise important questions of the role of law in information and content distribution and how private entities and the public might navigate the current technological terrain. I always enjoy David and James as insightful guests capable of wide-ranging discussion, and this show was no exception.


Show # 212 — Larry Downes, author of Big Bang Disruption — posted

I’m pleased to post Show # 212, May 14, my interview with three-time Hearsay Culture guest Larry Downes, co-author of Big Bang Disruption, on disruptive technology and business strategies. Larry and his co-author Paul Nunes (who was not on the show) have written an insightful and enjoyable book looking at both the causes of and reaction to disruptive technologies by new and traditional businesses alike. Like the book, which is bifurcated between descriptive and proscriptive analysis of rapidly-disruptive technologies, we talked about the meaning and impact of “big bang” distruptive technologies and how companies can both react to and create environments that create disruptive technology. As always, I greatly enjoyed our discussion!


Show # 209 — Lousewies van der Laan on liberal and e-democracy — posted

I am thrilled to post Show #209, April 15, Dutch politician and former European Parliament member Lousewies van der Laan on promoting democracy and technology. I met Lousewies at a conference on innovating justice at The Hague in 2012. Lousewies is a leading voice on democracy and human rights in the EU, and I was delighted to have her on the show to discuss a wide range of issues involving the operation of democracies in 2014. From the rise of the far right to the role of the public in policymaking, we had a terrific discussion that I greatly enjoyed. I look forward to chatting with Lousewies’ colleagues on upcoming shows!


Show #200 — me — to air January 8, 2014 and Hearsay Culture schwag!

As I’ve recently mentioned on a few shows, despite my reservations about not making the show “about me,” Show #200 will be guest host Denise Howell’s, of This Week in Law, interview with me. So that there’s no confusion, I’m not giving in to rank narcissism; rather, because several guests and listeners suggested that this would be a good way to celebrate this anniversary, I went along — and I’m glad that I did! I hope that you enjoy the discussion and Denise’s questions, which were excellent thanks to Denise’s abilities as an engaging, smart and knowledgeable interviewer. Note: because Hearsay Culture will be pre-empted by the Rose Bowl on January 1, we will air the show on January 8, before the new quarter begins the following week.

Additionally, as part of the 200th Show celebration, I plan to produce some Hearsay Culture schwag (my time permitting) — admittedly, this might be closer to giving in to narcissism. Among these items will be a mailer regarding the show’s seven-plus year history. Thus, if you have any comments about the show that you’d be willing to see reproduced in a mailer (with attribution), please send them my way at dave@hearsayculture.com (as always, all comments are welcome regardless). If your comment is for the mailer, please send it by January 3 and indicate your willingness to see it reproduced.

I’ll have more to say as the anniversary approaches, but for now, enjoy today’s posted shows and the holiday season! Thanks so much for listening!

Show #199 — Denise Howell — posted

I am pleased to post Show 199, December 4, my interview with Denise Howell of This Week in Law. Denise is a pioneering podcaster/”netcaster” who founded and co-hosts the outstanding This Week in Law. Up front, I’ll disclose that I am a big fan of Denise and This Week in Law. I’m also a former guest. Thus, I was thrilled to have Denise on the show to discuss our podcasting world. As the subject of podcasting itself is rarely discussed — indeed, the last major discussion that I had about it was Show #3, in June 2006, with Colette Vogele, it was past time to discuss the state of our mutual interest. We had a great discussion and, as expected, I enjoyed it!

Show #198 — Prof. Alasdair Roberts — posted

I am pleased to post Show 198, November 27, my interview with Prof. Alasdair Roberts, author of The End of Protest. Al’s book addresses a vexing question: why, in the face of an unprecedented financial crisis, have we not seen massive protests in the street? In this study, Al posits that a combination of regulatory, social and technological forces have created this state of affairs. In our discussion, we examined the depths of this problem and what it means for speech and government operations in the future. As always, I greatly enjoyed the discussion!

Show #197 — Dan Nazer — posted

At the request of several listeners who report that embedding more than one show in a single post screws up their RSS feed, I am going to embed one show per blog post for the foreseeable future. Thus, here’s Show 197, November 20, my interview with Dan Nazer of the Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) [Disclosure: I have occasionally made modest (remember: I am a law professor who makes $0 on projects like Hearsay Culture) donations to EFF]. Dan is at the forefront of the legislative battle over patent trolls/non-practicing entities/patent assertion entities, an issue that has been at the forefront of recent intellectual property battles. This highly controversial practice has been a recurring focus of Hearsay Culture, from both sides of the policy argument. In this interview, we discussed Dan and EFF’s efforts to curtail this practice and what it means for innovation and technology on a going-forward basis. I greatly enjoyed the discussion!

Shows 195-196 — Margot Kaminski and Prof. Victoria Stodden — posted

A busy several weeks pushing for a more accountable and public negotiation of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), which has brought the concept of legislative secrecy in a democracy to a new level, has not stopped me (but has slowed down) recording and posting of new shows. Thus, I’m pleased to post two new shows!

The first, Show 195, October 30, is my interview with Margot Kaminski of Yale Law School’s Information Society Project. We discussed an earlier draft of her forthcoming article The Capture of International Intellectual Property Law through the U.S. Trade Regime. Related to the above, Margot has written an insightful analysis of the administrative law that has arguably created the lack of public input in trade negotiations like TPP. Margot’s article is an important contribution to the growing body of scholarship on trade and intellectual property, and I greatly enjoyed our discussion!

Show 196, November 6, is my interview with Prof. Victoria Stodden of Columbia University on software patents and scientific transparency. Victoria has been doing vital work in this underexplored but critically important area in innovation policy. Having heard a presentation of a draft article on this topic at a recent intellectual property law scholars conference, I was excited to have Victoria on the show. We had a terrific discussion about how software patents impact the flow of information between researchers and educational institutions, and the ramifications of this reality.

shows 178-181 — Eran Kahana, Prof. Gabriella Coleman, Dean Anne Balsamo and David Seubert — posted

At long last, I’m posting four new shows. Thanks for your patience — teaching nine credits (for a law professor, that’s a lot) on top of writing, advocacy and administrative duties = slow to post shows! The good news: I should have more time (and timeliness) to devote to the show beginning in May, which will nicely coincide with the early part of the spring quarter.

On to the new content: the first show, Show #178, January 31, is my interview with Eran Kahana of the Maslon law firm, on artificial intelligence. Eran focuses on how the law should react as artificial intelligence becomes commonplace in the everyday lives of consumers. Because this technology is awash with speculation about its potential and risks, Eran was a great guest with whom to cut through much of the debate, especially as he has the practical perspective of a practicing attorney. I enjoyed the conversation.

Next, Show #179, February 14, is my interview with Prof. Gabriella Coleman, author of Coding Freedom: The Aesthetics and the Ethics of Hacking. Biella has written a groundbreaking anthropological study of free software hackers. Immersing herself in that community over the course of several years, Biella was able to unmask many morees and practices within the community that have received scant (if any) attention. We had a wide-ranging discussion about the demographics of the community, particularly the notable absence of a significant female presence, and I greatly enjoyed our discussion. Her’s is a wonderful contribution to our understanding of anthropological study and method.

My third show, Show #180, March 7, is my interview with Dean Anne Balsamo of the New School for Public Engagement, author of Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work. Focusing on culture as an iterative process, Anne has written a first-hand account of the creation of digital media through the eyes of a scholar and “maker.” Drawing on extensive experience in the field, Anne outlines how innovation occurs in a field that seems loose in organization and structure. Anne’s book dispels that notion (and others), and I greatly enjoyed the depth of our discussion and Anne’s probing insights. I look forward to her return to the show.

The last show for the winter quarter, Show #181, March 14, is my interview with Dave Seubert, head of the University of California Santa Barbara’s Cylinder Digitization and Preservation Project. I have been a fan of David’s cylinder project — the effort to digitize thousands of recordings made on cylinders between roughly 1890-1920s — since its inception several years ago (I’m not just a fan; I have cylinders on my iPod). David’s efforts, which include not just digitizing cylinders but preserving the legacy of Victor recordings, places his projects among the world’s most important recording preservation efforts. A huge fan of David and his work, we discussed these projects interspersed with recordings from UCSB’s collection. Lots of fun!

I am in the process of setting the schedule for the spring quarter, and will post it by the end of the second week in April. As always, I welcome your feedback and suggestions at dave@hearsayculture.com. Thanks, as always, for listening!