I’m very excited to post Show # 221, August 13, my interview with Prof. Frederick Schauer, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, and formerly of Harvard’s Kennedy School, on the “right to know.” I heard Fred discuss this issue at a panel that I moderated on the philosophy of information at Duke Law School earlier this year, and was unsurprisingly blown away by his insights on the issues at stake and questions to be answered in “right to know” analysis. This seemingly simple question has become surprisingly complex in the world of multidirectional communication by institutions and individuals on interconnected networks (like the “Inter-net”). I was thrilled to have Fred on the show, and the discussion was fascinating. I hope that you enjoy it.


I’m pleased to post Show # 220, August 6, my interview with James Grimmelmann of the University of Maryland School of Law and David Post of Temple University School of Law, on the recent US Supreme Court decision in ABC, Inc. v. Aereo and Facebook’s emotional manipulation study. David and James are both repeat guests on Hearsay Culture, but have never been on together. We focused on two issues: (a) the Aereo amicus brief authored by David and James on behalf of law professors, and the impact of the Aereo decision on copyright law and how new content delivery systems may or may not run afoul of copyright law, and (b) the impact of Facebook’s secretive 2014 behavioral study in which it manipulated the content delivered to users’ newsfeeds, particularly James’ extensive analysis of the problems associated with the study. Both issues raise important questions of the role of law in information and content distribution and how private entities and the public might navigate the current technological terrain. I always enjoy David and James as insightful guests capable of wide-ranging discussion, and this show was no exception.


I’m pleased to post Show # 219, July 30 my interview with David Zweig, author of Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion. David has written a fascinating account of individuals who achieve professional success and satisfaction without engaging in the personal publicity efforts that are the hallmark of modern communications and socialization. While he is not opposed to social media, his critical take on its powers of distortion and limitations are worthy of deep consideration, which he admirably tackles in his book. In our conversation, we delved into the characteristics of his “invisibles” and what social media has — and has not — done for our humanity. I greatly enjoyed the discussion!


I’ve been meaning to post that I’m visiting this year at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). I’m thrilled and privileged to be part of such a dynamic group of scholars and policy wonks who integrate a deep understanding of computing technology with policy analysis and advocacy. As I wrote on my first blog post for CITP: “Every CITP scholar that I’ve gotten to know over the past several years have become friends and influenced my work in areas ranging from voting machine code access to international lawmaking processes. I’m delighted to be a part of CITP’s dynamic team and environment and look forward to an exciting year.” I’ll be working on my research involving input processes in technology policymaking, trade secret reform, and access to proprietary technological information.

Of even more relevance to my wonderful listeners, I’ll also be conducting interviews while at Princeton. Because I’m physically present there on and off, I’m looking forward to taking advantage of the opportunity to do “in studio” interviews with the range of Princeton’s faculty and affiliated scholars when I’m there. Appropriately, I’ll do my first interview with CITP’s Ed Felten in November, but look for interviews with others. And if you’re nearby and want to stop by and say hello, or have suggestions about people I should meet while I’m there, please let me know at dave@hearsayculture.com!

Thanks, as always, for listening! You’re why I do the show.


I’m pleased to post Show # 218, July 23, my interview with Julia Lane of the American Institutes for Research and Prof. Victoria Stodden of the iSchool at Illinois, co-editors of Privacy, Big Data, and the Public Good: Frameworks for Engagement. Julia and Victoria, along with their co-editors Stefan Bender and Helen Nissenbaum (who were not on this show), have collected an impressive array of scholars to study the creation and use of “big data” — massive data sets — by government. Covering not only policy but the economics and statistics considerations of application of big data to decision-making, Julia and Victoria put together a wonderful resource on the challenges and opportunities of big data on a going-forward basis. I greatly enjoyed our discussion, and am a big fan of their work.


Today begins what I hope will be posting of several backlogged shows over the coming few days. My apologies for the delay, but I can assure you that its been for good reasons involving students, advocacy, writing deadlines and a deep desire to maintain contact with my wife and children.

So here we go. I’m pleased to post Show # 217, July 16, my interview with Alex Wright, author of Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age. Alex, who was previously on the show back in 2008 discussing his terrific book Glut, has written a fascinating biography of the heretofore forgotten information utopian named Paul Otlet. Otlet’s vision for a catalog of all of the world’s information is both inspiring and admirable, given his efforts spanned the first half of the twentieth century. In our interview, we discussed Otlet and his relevance to today’s issues involving information access, filtering and systems. As before, I greatly enjoyed our discussion and Alex’s work.


I’m pleased to post Show # 216, July 9, my interview with Prof. David Schanzer of Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy, on Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency (NSA). It was a bit over a year ago that Edward Snowden appeared on the scene as the source of a seemingly-endless array of information about the NSA’s legal and illegal spying. Snowden has since become a household name for his willingness to expose this behavior despite significant personal risk, which has caused scholars, policymakers and others to weigh in on how Snowden should be viewed. In my interview with David, we discussed David’s views on Snowden as a felon, and whether the “whistleblower” label is appropriate. In the process, we also discussed some of the NSA’s activities and how policymakers might approach reform of the NSA. David’s experience in the counter-terrorism and law enforcement world is vast, and I greatly enjoyed the discussion.


For the first show of the summer quarter, I have the privilege of posting Show # 215, July 2, my interview with Carl Oechsner of Croton Friends of History, and my middle school social studies teacher, mentor and inspiration, on children, teaching and technology. I am thrilled to interview Carl for the show, which was in-part inspired by my continued attempt at emulating Carl’s passion for teaching outside of the classroom.

As I noted in the schedule, Carl’s influence and teaching brilliance inspired me to pursue law, government and history. Carl discusses that passion for teaching in the interview, as well as his reflections on 30+ years as a truly legendary public school teacher. It was a wonderful discussion that I greatly enjoyed.

One personal note: As a society, we don’t do enough to show thanks to our teachers. The intrinsic rewards of teaching are primarily measured in the impact that one teacher can have on the lives of the students with whom that teacher interacts. But it is the rare teacher that can display the excitement, inquisitiveness and intelligence necessary to alter a generation of students’ lives permanently for the better. I was fortunate to draw Carl as a teacher, and ultimately, this show is my way of saying thank you Carl — Mr. O — for all that you did and continue to do. May this interview be one token of my appreciation and respect.


As I finalize the schedule for the summer quarter (to be posted on July 4th!), I’m pleased to post Show # 214, May 28, my interview with Prof. Evan Selinger of Rochester Institute of Technology on technology and the human experience. Evan’s work spans the range of technology, ethics and philosophy, an unusual but critical intersection as we consider the ramifications of algorithms, robotics, drones, 3D printers and social media, among many other innovations, on our lives. In our discussion, we focused on Evan’s concern about “outsourcing” our humanity to computers and technology and how it has and will impact our humanity. Evan is an insightful and original commentator and scholar, and I greatly enjoyed our discussion!


Last in the current barrage of shows is Show # 213, May 21, my interview with Ryan Calo of University of Washington School of Law and Woodrow Hartzog of Cumberland School of Law on robotics law. Although robotics and drones have come up occasionally on Hearsay Culture, they have never been the primary topic. It was arguably past the time to end that drought. Ryan and Woody are two scholars leading the discussion of the law and policy that should guide the mass entrance of robotics into everyday life (closely related to the emergent concept of the Internet of Things). We discussed everything from their We Robot conference to whether robotics will be the downfall of society (the latter sounds like typical Internet hysteria, but that is indeed the focus of the linked article). As expected, I greatly enjoyed the discussion, and fully expect that this will be the first of many discussions of robots and the law!



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» Upcoming Guests Show # 222, October 16: Prof. David Golumbia of Virginia Commonwealth University, author of The Cultural Logic of Computation. More # 0

» Most Recent Podcasts: Show # 221, August 13: Prof. Frederick Schauer, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, and formerly of Harvard’s Kennedy School, on the “right to know;” Show # 220, August 6: James Grimmelmann of the University of Maryland School of Law and David Post of Temple University School of Law, on the recent US Supreme Court decision in ABC, Inc. v. Aereo and Facebook’s emotional manipulation study; Show # 219, July 30: David Zweig, author of Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion; Show # 218, July 13: Julia Lane of the American Institutes for Research and Prof. Victoria Stodden of the iSchool at Illinois, co-editors of Privacy, Big Data, and the Public Good: Frameworks for Engagement; Show # 217, July 3: Alex Wright, author of Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age. More blawg100_2008_honoree_clr_small facebook-icon-16x16.png   Become a fan of the Hearsay Culture Facebook page!  # 0